Cannabis consumers have long prized potency (a high THC content) as one of the main factors that makes a particular strain more desirable. Though traditional demand for THC has caused an oversaturation of high-potency products, many consumers are starting to prefer less intense products that are lower in THC and higher in the non-intoxicating compound called cannabidiol (CBD).
Another concern is about medications with which CBD might interact. This won’t be an issue with most drugs, says Sunil Kumar Aggarwal, M.D., Ph.D., a palliative medicine physician and scientist who studies cannabis and integrates it into his Seattle medical practice. The exceptions are blood thinners, IV antibiotics, and other drugs whose exact dosing is crucial and must be monitored closely, he says. (Of course, if you have a health problem, talk to your doctor before using CBD, and never take it instead of seeing your physician for a serious condition.)
With the increasing hype surrounding CBD, some — including this author — have speculated that it will become the next health fad, like taking fish oil or opting for a gluten-free diet, whether or not the research to support far-reaching health benefit claims pans out (see this recent New York Times op-ed by Cornell Medical College psychiatrist Richard Friedman urging caution). “Big Beverage” companies like Coca-Cola have even been exploring whether they should jump in the ring lest they miss out, bringing CBD infused drinks to the mass market sometime in the not-too-distant future (see my blogpost "Coca, Cola, and Cannabis: Psychoactive Drugs as Beverages").
CBD, or cannabidiol, is a cannabinoid found in the hemp plant. As we’ve discovered more about the human species as well as the plants that we’ve learned of the immense health value that CBD brings to the table. It has quickly become a staple supplement for millions who seek a natural alternative to dangerous pharmaceuticals, alien to nature’s perfect remedies.
Other “minor phytocannabinoids” in cannabis may also contribute relevant activity (McPartland and Russo 2001). Cannabichromene (CBC) is the third most prevalent cannabinoid in cannabis, and is also anti-inflammatory (Wirth et al 1980), and analgesic, if weaker than THC (Davis and Hatoum 1983). Cannabigerol (CBG) displays sub-micromolar affinity for CB1 and CB2 (Gauson et al 2007). It also exhibits GABA uptake inhibition to a greater extent than THC or CBD (Banerjee et al 1975), suggesting possible utilization as a muscle relaxant in spasticity. Furthermore, CBG has more potent analgesic, anti-erythema and lipooxygenase blocking activity than THC (Evans 1991), mechanisms that merit further investigation. It requires emphasis that drug stains of North American (ElSohly et al 2000; Mehmedic et al 2005), and European (King et al 2005) cannabis display relatively high concentrations of THC, but are virtually lacking in CBD or other phytocannabinoid content.

In September 2005, New Scientist reported that researchers at the Canberra Institute of Technology had identified a new type of Cannabis based on analysis of mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA.[81] The New Scientist story, which was picked up by many news agencies and web sites, indicated that the research was to be published in the journal Forensic Science International.[82]
So. According to the Controlled Substance Act definition itself, certain parts of the cannabis plant are clearly illegal, while others fall into a grayer area. One of these – for the most part – is CBD extracted from the “legal” parts of the cannabis plant, and non-marijuana industrial hemp plants, which, as defined by Section 7606 of the Farm Bill are cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC.

Buying CBD oil online is problematical. A study from the University of Pennsylvania published in 2017 found that nearly 70 percent of products sold online do not contain the concentration of the oil listed on the label. The researchers bought and analyzed 84 products from 31 different companies and found that more than 42 percent were under-labeled, meaning that they contained more CBD than indicated. Another 26 percent were over-labeled, with less CBD than indicated. The researchers wrote that while studies haven’t shown that too much CBD can be harmful, products containing too much or too little may not give purchasers the effects they seek. In addition, the team reported that a number of products analyzed contained a significant amount of THC, which can cause undesired effects.

Some scientific studies have found that babies born to women who use marijuana during their pregnancies display altered responses to visual stimulation, increased tremors and a high-pitched cry, which may indicate problems with nervous system development. During preschool and early school years, marijuana-exposed children have been reported to exhibit more behavioral problems and difficulties with sustained attention and memory than unexposed children.
Given the opioid crisis, physicians are less likely to lead with narcotics, and some of us are deciding not to prescribe them altogether. The problem with narcotics is that they work. They work really well. Sometimes too well, leading to a patient becoming so comfortable they “forget” to breathe. So, while reducing the amount of narcotics prescribed to patients is a good thing, the problem is physicians don’t have a lot of good alternatives to recommend to their patients, until now.
CBD Oil can also contain ZERO amount of THC. If this were coffee, it’s all in the grind. It still is, figuratively, for hemp CBD oil. We developed a product from listening to our customers that needed 100% certainty their oil didn’t contain trace amounts of THC. Like who? First responders, athletes, military personnel, or anyone that wants 100% confidence they’re consuming only CBD. Read more about it here.
Information from adverse event reports regarding marijuana use is extremely limited; the FDA primarily receives adverse event reports for approved products. General information on the potential adverse effects of using marijuana and its constituents can come from clinical trials using marijuana that have been published, as well as from spontaneously reported adverse events sent to the FDA. Additional information about the safety and effectiveness of marijuana and its constituents is needed. Clinical trials of marijuana conducted under an IND application could collect this important information as a part of the drug development process.
President Obama’s execution of the Agricultural Act of 2014 is an integral piece to CBD oil’s legality. If a plant is deemed legal (where the determining factor is a THC level under .3%) that then makes all products made from the source material legal as well. Did you ever wonder why your hemp lotion 15-20 years ago was legal but “smoking a little weed” wasn’t? In this case, it’s all about the THC levels your plant doesn’t have.
The endocannabinoid system is tonically active in control of pain, as demonstrated by the ability of SR141716A (rimonabant), a CB1 antagonist, to produce hyperalgesia upon administration to mice (Richardson et al 1997). As mentioned above, the ECS is active throughout the neuraxis, including integrative functions in the periacqueductal gray (Walker et al 1999a; Walker et al 1999b), and in the ventroposterolateral nucleus of the thalamus, in which cannabinoids proved to be 10-fold more potent than morphine in wide dynamic range neurons mediating pain (Martin et al 1996). The ECS also mediates central stress-induced analgesia (Hohmann et al 2005), and is active in nociceptive spinal areas (Hohmann et al 1995; Richardson et al 1998a) including mechanisms of wind-up (Strangman and Walker 1999) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (Richardson et al 1998b). It was recently demonstrated that cannabinoid agonists suppress the maintenance of vincristine-induced allodynia through activation of CB1 and CB2 receptors in the spinal cord (Rahn et al 2007). The ECS is also active peripherally (Richardson et al 1998c) where CB1 stimulation reduces pain, inflammation and hyperalgesia. These mechanisms were also proven to include mediation of contact dermatitis via CB1 and CB2 with benefits of THC noted systemically and locally on inflammation and itch (Karsak et al 2007). Recent experiments in mice have even suggested the paramount importance of peripheral over central CB1 receptors in nociception of pain (Agarwal et al 2007)
The oil contained in the hemp seed is 75-80% polyunsaturated fatty acids (the good fats) and only 9-11% of the less desired saturated fatty acids. Hemp seed oil is reputed to be the most unsaturated oil derived from the plant kingdom. The essential fatty acids contained in hemp seed oil are required in our diet more than any other vitamin, yet our bodies do not naturally produce them. They must be obtained from external sources in the food we eat. Essential fatty acids are involved with producing life's energy throughout the human body and without them, life is not possible. In general, North Americans have a high dietary deficiency in essential fatty acids due to our high intake of animal fats versus plant fats, caused by our high consumption of processed foods and meats versus natural organic foods.

Industrial hemp contains, by weight, far less CBD than CBD-rich cultivars such as Harlequin or Sour Tsunami. This means that producing a single 10 mL dose of CBD would require the cultivation and extraction of far more hemp than it would from whole-plant marijuana; thus raising the risk of exposing users to more contaminants. Hemp is classified as a “bioaccumulator,” or a plant that naturally absorbs toxicants from the soil.
The Marinol patient monograph cautions that patients should not drive, operate machinery or engage in hazardous activities until accustomed to the drug’s effects (http://www.solvaypharmaceuticals-us.com/static/wma/pdf/1/3/1/9/Marinol5000124ERev52003.pdf). The Sativex product monograph in Canada (http://www.bayerhealth.ca/display.cfm?Object_ID=272&Article_ID=121&expandMenu_ID=53&prevSubItem=5_52) suggests that patients taking it should not drive automobiles. Given that THC is the most active component affecting such abilities, and the low serum levels produced in Sativex therapy (vide supra), it would be logical that that patients may be able to safely engage in such activities after early dose titration and according to individual circumstances, much as suggested for oral dronabinol. This is particularly the case in view of a report by an expert panel (Grotenhermen et al 2005) that comprehensively analyzed cannabinoids and driving. It suggested scientific standards such as roadside sobriety tests, and THC serum levels of 7–10 ng/mL or less, as reasonable approaches to determine relative impairment. No studies have demonstrated significant problems in relation to cannabis affecting driving skills at plasma levels below 5 ng/mL of THC. Prior studies document that 4 rapid oromucosal sprays of Sativex (greater than the average single dose employed in therapy) produced serum levels well below this threshold (Russo 2006b). Sativex is now well established as a cannabinoid agent with minimal psychotropic effect.

Industrial hemp contains, by weight, far less CBD than CBD-rich cultivars such as Harlequin or Sour Tsunami. This means that producing a single 10 mL dose of CBD would require the cultivation and extraction of far more hemp than it would from whole-plant marijuana; thus raising the risk of exposing users to more contaminants. Hemp is classified as a “bioaccumulator,” or a plant that naturally absorbs toxicants from the soil.
An alternative to the gateway hypothesis is the common liability to addiction (CLA) theory. It states that some individuals are, for various reasons, willing to try multiple recreational substances. The "gateway" drugs are merely those that are (usually) available at an earlier age than the harder drugs. Researchers have noted in an extensive review that it is dangerous to present the sequence of events described in gateway "theory" in causative terms as this hinders both research and intervention.[270]
Now, with the passing of the new 2018 Farm Bill, hemp and hemp-derived products have been officially removed from the purview of the Controlled Substances Act, such that they are no longer subject to Schedule I status. Meaning that so long as CBD is extracted from hemp and completely pure (without any THC — something the DEA doubts is possible) and grown by licensed farmers in accordance with state and federal regulations, it is legal as a hemp product.

Strains such as Charlotte's Web, that started out being classified as "marijuana" strains, have now been able to be reclassified as Hemp strains, due to the meeting of the .3% THC threshold. This is an important designation, as breeders are now breeding Cannabis strains down to acceptable THC levels, while still offering a plant that carries all of the other combinations of naturally occurring Cannabinoids, which provide a synergistic effect when taken together along with the plants given Terpenoid and Flavanoid profiles.
The information contained on this website ("Content") represents the views and opinions of the persons or entities expressing them. The Content does not represent an endorsement by, or the views and opinions of, Entrepreneur Media, Inc. ("EMI"), is intended for informational and educational purposes only, and should in no way be interpreted as medical, legal, or any other advice concerning the cultivation, sale, or any other use of marijuana, which, although legal in some states and local jurisdictions throughout the United States, is currently illegal under federal law, as well as in other states and local jurisdictions. Because of the variety of laws, regulations, and ordinances concerning marijuana, the Content may not be suitable for your situation. Consequently, EMI makes no expressed or implied warranties nor assumes any liability whatsoever, concerning the accuracy or reliability of the information contained herein, including warranties about the legality of, or likelihood of success in, conducting a cannabis business. EMI does not advocate violating applicable law, and therefore strongly recommends that you carefully research applicable laws, and consult with appropriate licensed professionals and other experts, before taking any action in connection with, or based on, such Content.
A. The FDA is aware that several states have either passed laws that remove state restrictions on the medical use of marijuana and its derivatives or are considering doing so. It is important to conduct medical research into the safety and effectiveness of marijuana products through adequate and well-controlled clinical trials. We welcome the opportunity to talk with states who are considering support for medical research of marijuana and its derivatives to provide information on Federal and scientific standards.
The existence of substantial clinical investigations regarding CBD has been made public. For example, two such substantial clinical investigations include GW Pharmaceuticals’ investigations regarding Sativex and Epidiolex. (See Sativex Commences US Phase II/III Clinical Trial in Cancer Pain and GW Pharmaceuticals Receives Investigational New Drug (IND) from FDA for Phase 2/3 Clinical Trial of Epidiolex in the Treatment of Dravet Syndrome ).

I have been a member around a year maybe less, but I just need to tell you how much I appreciate you all. I have 3 kids and husband and was crippled with my health problems and drugs from all the doctors, I had to take. I am so much better off today. I can now contribute to my family. I feel hope for the first time for a future with them. Thank you, God Bless You!

My husband considers CBD essential to his treatment plan. He suffers from TBI caused by HSE, dystonia (right side, plus neck and face), ankylosing spondylitis, spinal bone spurs and nerve impingement, CFS/ME, lifelong insomnia, and plain old arthritis; he’s convinced that CBD has been the key for being able to reduce (with the goal of eventually eliminating) his Klonopin as quickly as he has, and for managing the reduction of his pain script.

CBD Oil

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