Furthermore, medical cannabis use is legal in many more places than recreational marijuana use. Current research, alongside patient and caregiver testimony, attests to the many medicinal applications of marijuana. From pain to serious neurological diseases, medical cannabis is emerging as a safe and viable alternative to many common prescription medications.
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In one study, researchers found that out of 150 reckless drivers who were tested for drugs at an arrest scene, 33 percent tested positive for marijuana and 12 percent tested positive for both marijuana and cocaine. Data also show that after smoking marijuana, people demonstrate the same lack of coordination on standard drunken-driving tests as do those who have had too much to drink.
While it’s true that CBD is legal in all 50 states, there are situations when it isn’t legal. The difference between legal and illegal typically depends on several important factors determined by the state in question. There is, however, one very important factor that is a crucial determinant across all states, and that is where the CBD is derived from–hemp or marijuana.
Australia's National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre (NCPIC) states that the buds (flowers) of the female cannabis plant contain the highest concentration of THC, followed by the leaves. The stalks and seeds have "much lower THC levels".[161] The UN states that leaves can contain ten times less THC than the buds, and the stalks one hundred times less THC.[158]
Cannabis, (genus Cannabis), plant belonging to the family Cannabaceae of the nettle order (Urticales). By some classifications, the genus Cannabis comprises a single species, hemp (Cannabis sativa), a stout, aromatic, erect annual herb that originated in Central Asia and is now cultivated worldwide, including in Europe, southern Asia, the Middle East, India, Africa, and the Americas. A tall canelike variety is raised for the production of hemp fibre, while the female plant of a short branchier variety is prized as the more abundant source of the psychoactive substance tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active ingredient of marijuana.
Several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids for nausea and vomiting in the advanced stages of illnesses such as cancer and AIDS. Dronabinol (tetrahydrocannabinol) has been available by prescription for more than a decade in the USA. Other therapeutic uses of cannabinoids are being demonstrated by controlled studies, including treatment of asthma and glaucoma, as an antidepressant, appetite stimulant, anticonvulsant and anti-spasmodic, research in this area should continue. For example, more basic research on the central and peripheral mechanisms of the effects of cannabinoids on gastrointestinal function may improve the ability to alleviate nausea and emesis. More research is needed on the basic neuropharmacology of THC and other cannabinoids so that better therapeutic agents can be found.
Given the opioid crisis, physicians are less likely to lead with narcotics, and some of us are deciding not to prescribe them altogether. The problem with narcotics is that they work. They work really well. Sometimes too well, leading to a patient becoming so comfortable they “forget” to breathe. So, while reducing the amount of narcotics prescribed to patients is a good thing, the problem is physicians don’t have a lot of good alternatives to recommend to their patients, until now.
Under the Controlled Substances Act – passed by Congress and enforced by the DEA – the mature stalk of a cannabis plant can be used legally (we will dive into this shortly) – which means CBD extracted from the stalk is also legal. Meanwhile, the 2014 Farm Bill allows states to pass laws relating to the extraction of CBD and other compounds from the hemp plant – specifically the industrial hemp plant – while also allowing industrial hemp to be legally imported from other countries. The FDA’s role in marijuana and CBD marketing and labeling has added additional complexity to the situation. Because many manufacturers attempt to market THC and CBD-containing products as dietary supplements, they violate the FD&C Act sections 201 (ff)(3)(B)(i) and (ii). Clinical investigations are currently needed to promote a product as a dietary supplement unless the supplement was publicly available before the Act was passed. The FDA, however, claims to believe in the validity of scientific research furthering the introduction of these substances for medical purposes and has approved the first CBD-containing epilepsy drug just this year. So…what’s the official word? Which details you should familiarize yourself with? Where should you start?
Hey Justin, after further research and consultation it looks like the law is still a little unclear. According to NWTimes, CBD is now legal; however the law further clarifies that the CBD must contain certification that it contains less than 0.3% THC and is derived from industrial-hemp and not marijuana. That said, CBD from industrial hemp is legal for recreational usage, while CBD derived from marijuana is still viewed under the same laws as marijuana.… Read more »
There is also still a small risk of THC getting into the system, even from hemp seeds, which normally contain no THC. The THC could be present as a result of contamination with other plant matter. The results of a 2017 study show that some commercial brands of food-grade hemp seeds can have a THC concentration that is as much as 1,250 percent higher than the legal limit.
A 2012 study reported that, “systemic and intrathecal administration of cannabidiol (CBD), a major nonpsychoactive component of marijuana, and its modified derivatives significantly suppress chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain without causing apparent analgesic tolerance…These cannabinoids may represent a novel class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of chronic pain and other diseases…”
There have been a number of studies investigating the conceivable part of CBD oil in vanquishing pain of all proportions, be it menstrual cramps or pain of a chronic magnitude. The Journal of Experimental medicine speaks about the utilization of CBD oil for suppressing neuropathic pain in rodents. In spite of the fact that such studies are yet to be replicated with human beings, CBD oil is a good tolerance-builder, an agent that enhances the physique’s ability to cope with and be resilient to pain.
In 2014, the Kentucky legislature revised the definition of marijuana under state law to create legal protection for patients who use a cannabidiol (CBD) medicine as part of an approved clinical trial or on the written order of “a physician practicing at a hospital or associated clinic affiliated with a Kentucky public university having a college or school of medicine.”

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